About Atmospheric Research in Antarctica

What is 2ODIAC? What are we doing? Why does it matter?
Find out here!

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Meet the Team

 

Interdisciplinary, multi-institutional team of scientists braving the Earth's coldest, driest, and windiest continent.

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Living at the Edge of the World

 

Find out what life in Antarctica on the ice and at McMurdo is like!
Updated in conjunction with blog posts.

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The End of 2ODIAC (for now)

The time has come once again to bid farewell to the ice. The instruments have been taken off-line, packed up, and are ready to be shipped back home. All of our borrowed gear is being returned to the various departments at McMurdo from whence it came. This includes our beloved fish hut 17:     […]

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How Cold is Cold?

The coldest temperature recorded on Earth using a thermometer was -89.2C (-128.6F) at Vostok Station, in Antarctica, back in 1983. However,  my colleagues at the National Snow and Ice Data Center believe they found a temperature of -93.2C (-135.8F) near Dome Fuji (Antarctica) using the Landsat 8 satellite. There is a hope to establish an […]

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Anemometers and Wind

Antarctica is a notoriously windy place.  The windiest place on Earth is said to be Commonwealth Bay, Antarctica, where winds often exceed 240km/h (150mph) and the average wind speed is 80km/h (50mph). The cold dense air that forms high on the Antarctic plateau can rush down to the coast at tremendous speeds under the force […]

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Science Neighbors

There are only four (4) science groups at McMurdo during WINFLY. It is a very friendly atmosphere among the science teams as everyone understands the difficulty of working in Antarctica. Radio chatter will often be about conditions near various science camps or observations that could be relevant to each others projects… and the opportunity to […]

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Snow

Antarctica is the coldest, highest and driest continent in the world. It is largely a desert, with most places receiving less than 250mm of water equivalent each year. Despite low precipitation, snow is often mobile at this time of year (September) due to unsettled weather, very cold temperatures and some very high wind speed events. […]

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Fata Morgana

Polar regions can produce some interesting optical effects due to extreme temperatures and/or low sun angles. Yesterday was beautifully calm at Zodiac Camp and an inversion formed (i.e. when air closer to the surface is colder than the air above it – normally air temperatures decrease with altitude). The colder, denser air near the surface […]

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Instrument Surgury

The scientific results from field campaigns are well reported in academic journals, often with text such as “measurements were taken during …”. However, the effort required to produce these results, including all the problems that had to be overcome, are rarely documented in full.   2odiac 2015 has not been a simple case of transporting […]

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Flagging

The weather in Antarctica is notoriously fickle. It can be sunny with glorious views of glaciers, ice sheets and mountains, but within an hour a raging storm may engulf you in a white-out. A white-out is just that – blowing snow and winds mean that all you see is a white void and having any […]

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The break in the weather and the ice edge

The Break in the Weather For the past week, there has been a nasty low pressure system sitting off the coast of Ross Island. The weather around McMurdo has been Condition 2 or Condition 1 pretty much across the board. While it has been fairly cold with wind chill temperatures hitting -50C, the main problem […]

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Season 2 – Winfly 2015

Welcome back! First, let me extend a warm welcome to everyone, both to newcomers to this blog and those who followed us last year. All of us involved in the 2015 field season (Lars, Mike, Drew, Doug, and Anondo) are excited to be heading to Antarctica. We would like to first thank the team members […]

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